UCF Science Cafe

UCF Science Cafe

You are invited to come and listen to UCF and national researchers talk about their work while enjoying wine and appetizers. Please RSVP by clicking on the RSVP link below.

Click to RSVP

Time:  Networking, drinks and appetizers at 6:30 p.m. and talk begins at 7:00 p.m.

Proudly hosted by:

  • Office of Research & Commercialization
  • Department of Physics
  • Environmental Health & Safety
  • Graduate Society of Physics Students
  • Uknighted Chemistry Graduate Student Association

Upcoming Talks:

Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry

Tricking Crystals to Behave as Liquids for Efficient Conversion and Use of Energy

Location: Physical Sciences Bldg., Room 160
Date: Thursday, January 19, 2017, 6:30 p.m.
Time:  6:30 p.m. – networking, drinks and appetizers
7:00 p.m. – talk begins

The ability to design and impose molecular traits for specific properties in inorganic crystalline materials is one of the many challenges in materials science. In our research, we focus our efforts in the design and synthesis of organic and inorganic molecular components that possess well-known liquid state properties, to be incorporated in crystalline materials in the form of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This talk will describe the approaches followed in our research group to design and prepare advanced MOFs crystals that behave as liquids, for their application as photocatalysts (using sunlight to drive chemical reactions) for artificial photosynthesis—particularly reduction of carbon dioxide—and for electrochemical applications, such as electrolytes for the next generation of safe and efficient solid-state lithium-ion batteries.


Joseph DonoghueJoseph F. Donoghue, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Planetary Sciences group, Department of Physics

Have We Entered the Anthropocene? Human-Induced Climate Change

Location: Physical Sciences Bldg., Room 160
Date: Thursday, February 23, 2017, 6:30 p.m.
Time:  6:30 p.m. – networking, drinks and appetizers
7:00 p.m. – talk begins

The Anthropocene is a proposed new epoch in the geologic timescale, representing the time in Earth’s history during which humans have taken over from nature as the major agent of change. There is mounting evidence that this is true. Research has focused on several questions, including when the Anthropocene began, and how much of the observable change is attributable to humans versus natural cycles. There is some evidence that human actions have been altering Earth’s climate for more than 7,000 years, due to the development of agriculture and livestock domestication.  Global climate models project greenhouse gases doubling over pre-industrial levels during the next century, significantly accelerating the rise in global temperature and sea level.  Florida is one of the places where the projected sea-level rise will be most strongly felt.


Stephen M FioreStephen M. Fiore, PhD
Professor, Department of Philosophy and Institute for Simulation & Training

Becoming Transhuman: A Roadmap for Augmenting Cognition in the 21st Century

Location: Physical Sciences Bldg., Room 160
Date: Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 p.m.
Time:  6:30 p.m. – networking, drinks and appetizers
7:00 p.m. – talk begins

The 21st century presents a profound paradox for scientific research. On the one hand, we’ve been witness to exponential growth in understanding across scholarly disciplines coupled with technological advances allowing for nearly ubiquitous access to data, information, and knowledge. On the other hand, the cognitive and collaborative capacity of humans has not advanced at nearly the same pace. In short, there is a problematic asymmetry between the rapid advances in science and technology and the relatively glacial pace of evolution in human cognition. In this talk, I provide a path forward for addressing this paradox. I outline how the concept of transhumanism, made possible by developments in the cognitive sciences, can be adapted to augment collaborative cognition and help us solve some of the most challenging societal problems in the coming decades. I describe how advances in cognitive engineering and computer science, coupled with technology developments in augmented cognition and brain-computer interface, provide the potential for significant gains in cognition.


Subith S Vasu PhDSubith S. Vasu, PhD
Associate Professor, Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and Energy Research (CATER), Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (MAE)

State-of-the-art Experiments to investigate Combustion of Bio Fuels

Location: Physical Sciences Bldg., Room 160
Date: Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 p.m.
Time:  6:30 p.m. – networking, drinks and appetizers
7:00 p.m. – talk begins

The first part of this talk will describe using shock tube and laser absorption methods to investigate the oxidation of various hydrocarbon fuels (both fossil and bio based) that are relevant to advanced combustion and propulsion systems under practical conditions. The strategy of using shock tubes provide an ideal device for acquiring ignition delay times and species concentration time-histories, while laser-based diagnostic studies are non-intrusive, provide in-situ measurements (e.g., concentration of individual species including trace species, and temperature), and have fast-time response (micro-second). The second part of the talk will present state-of-the-art experimental tools – photoionization mass spectrometry using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation – to the combustion of next-generation biofuels that may be efficiently produced from biomass by endophytic fungi.