Study to Try to Reduce Misinformation and Exploitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

Adult Development & Decision Lab
(Primary Investigator: Dr. Nichole Lighthall)

The Florida Consortium to Reduce Misinformation and Exploitation in Alzheimer’s Disease is seeking participants from ages 65-90 to join a paid study that will examine risk factors for deception and exploitation. The study will include seniors with memory impairments and those free of cognitive impairments. The results of this study will be used to identify predictors of fraud and inform interventions for reducing elder fraud.

This project is supported by the Florida Department of Health and conducted by Dr. Nichole Lighthall at the University of Central Florida (UCF). Participants will be asked to complete mental tasks and surveys at the UCF campus in Orlando, FL. Eligible participants will be offered the opportunity to join additional paid study components, including non-invasive brain imaging. Participants will receive compensation.

If you are interested in this study and would like to participate, please contact: Lighthall Lab

 

Deciding Brains

Adult Development & Decision Lab
(Primary Investigator: Dr. Nichole Lighthall)

The purpose of this research is to understand how people make trust-related decisions in healthy aging. The study will involve computer tasks and thinking games. Compensation will be provided.

If you are interested in this study and would like to participate, please contact: Lighthall Lab

 

Category Learning

Categorization & Decision Lab
(Primary Investigator: Dr. Corey Bohil)

We are studying the ways in which different learning systems in the brain change with age.

If you are interested in this study and would like to participate, please contact: Clay Killingsworth

 

Caregiver Support Groups

Orlando Later-Life Developmental Research Lab
(Primary Investigator: Dr. Daniel Paulson)

We are conducting a support group study for individuals caring for loved ones with dementia. Support groups provide an opportunity to speak openly about all aspects of caregiving in a supportive environment, and can have many benefits for caregivers. Support groups meet for 90 minutes per week for 6 weeks, with each meeting led by a Doctoral or Master’s level psychologist. Group meetings include informative discussions about self-care, dementia, improving communication, and managing dementia symptoms at home.

If you are interested in this study and would like to participate, please contact: Rachel Bassett